Answered By: Sarah Morehouse
Last Updated: May 01, 2015     Views: 34

Citing sources can seem complicated if you need to cite a quotation or piece of information that was cited in another source.

  • Source A says, "The sky is blue."
  • Source B says, "Source A says, 'The sky is blue.'"
  • You want to say, "Source A, quoted in Source B, says 'The sky is blue.'" 

It is very important that you give credit to both Source A (the originator of the information) and Source B (the means by which you found the information.) Here is how to do it:

For our examples:

Source A = "Color of the Sky" by Appel, 2010.
Source B = "Celestine Hues" by Bumkin, 2013.

APA

Option 1: Your signal phrase should mention both Source A and Source B. 

  • Appel, as quoted in Bumkin, says, "The sky is blue" (as cited in 2013, p. 150). 

Option 2: If mentioning Source A and Source B makes the language too awkward, you can just use your signal phrase to mention only Source A and indicate Source B in the parenthetical reference.

  • Appel says, "The sky is blue" (as cited in Bumkin, 2013, p. 150).

Source B always goes in your works cited just as it normally would.

MLA

Option 1: Your signal phrase should mention both Source A and Source B. 

  • Appel, as quoted in Bumkin, says "The sky is blue" (Bumkin 150). 

Option 2: If mentioning Source A and Source B makes the language too awkward, you can just use your signal phrase to mention only Source A and indicate Source B in the parenthetical reference.

  • Appel says, "The sky is blue" (qtd. in Bumkin 150). 

Source B always goes in your works cited just as it normally would.

Chicago

Your footnote or endnote will look like this: 

  • Jonathan Appel, "The sky is blue." in "Celestine Hues" by Marianna Bumkin (New York: SUNY Press, 2013), 150.

Your bibliography entry will look like this: 

  • Appel, Jonathan. "The sky is blue.". In "Celestine Hues" by Marianna Bumkin, 150. New York: SUNY Press, 2013. 
    • If this is a long quote, just use the first sentence or the first part of the first sentence!

 

It is ok to use indirect citations for information that is peripheral to your thesis/main topic. But in a major research project, if the information is absolutely essential to your thesis/topic, it is better to go back to the original source if you can. The original source will put the quote/information in context, and it may give you valuable additional information.

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